South Caucasus at a Crossroad: Thorny Realities and Great Expectations

South Caucasus at a Crossroad: Thorny Realities and Great Expectations

Book review by Alexander Iskandaryan

The volume’s name speaks for itself. South Caucasus at a Crossroad: Thorny Realities and Great Expectations celebrates ten years of the Heinrich Boell Foundation’s active presence in the South Caucasus. Those were a turbulent ten years for the region. Wars, conflicts and sealed borders remained part of the reality in the South Caucasus.

By Alexander Iskandaryan

Book review by Richard Giragosian

Despite the obvious strategic significance of the South Caucasus, this region received far too little scholarly attention and even less English-language analysis.  Against the backdrop of the paucity of analysis, a recent publication has sought to correct such a glaring oversight.

By Richard Giragosian

Book review by Kornely Kakachia

As the geopolitical significance of the South Caucasus region increases, so too does the need for comprehensive analysis of its political, social and economic frameworks. With contributions from multiple authors, the book entitled “South Caucasus at a Crossroad: Thorny Realities and Great Expectations” provides solid understanding of the prospects of regional development in a South Caucasus ridden by historical conflicts and political tensions.

Book review by Nani Macharashvili

The collection of works published by the Heinrich Boell Foundation under the name South Caucasus at a Crossroad: Right to Expanse and City brings together a broad spectrum of authors studying the post-Soviet experience of, and prospects for, the three South Caucasus countries.

Book review by David Sichinava

In the context of cultural and political geography, the South Caucasus resembles a multi-image carpet that reflects the variety of nations living there and of the local nature. The collection of articles published by the Heinrich Boell Foundation - South Caucasus at a Crossroad: Thorny Realities and Great Expectations - is equally colorful.

By David Sichinava