LGBT Rights

English

Solidarity Network for LGBTI in Armenia and Georgia

The Heinrich Böll Foundation South Caucasus Regional Office, with financial support of the EU, has initiated the implementation and overall supervision of a three-year action Solidarity Network for LGBTI in Armenia and Georgia, executed by a working group of NGOs - Women’s Initiatives Supporting Group (WISG), Human Rights Education and Monitoring Center (EMC) in Georgia and Society Without Violence (SWV) and Public Information and Need of Knowledge (PINK) in Armenia.

Europe, Let’s Speak Out for LGBTI Rights in South Caucasus

LGBTI individuals and LGBTI human rights defenders in Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia are facing huge challenges as LGBTI rights issues are currently shaped by EU, Russia, and South Caucasus geopolitical and economic interests. Could the European Neighbourhood Policy and other EU foreign policy initiatives contribute to the improvement of the LGBTI rights situation in the region?

By Carlotta Weber

Solidarity Network for LGBTI in Armenia and Georgia (2015-2017)

(closed project) The Heinrich Böll Foundation South Caucasus Regional Office, with financial support of the EU, has initiated the implementation and overall supervision of a three-year action Solidarity Network for LGBTI in Armenia and Georgia, executed by a working group of NGOs - Women’s Initiatives Supporting Group (WISG), Human Rights Education and Monitoring Center (EMC) in Georgia and Society Without Violence (SWV) and Public Information and Need of Knowledge (PINK) in Armenia.

"Die Proteste verändern die öffentliche Debatte dramatisch"

Wie Nino Lejava, Büroleiterin unseres Regionalbüros Südkaukasus die Hetzjagd auf eine friedliche protestierende LGBTI-Gruppe im Mai erlebte und was sich seitdem in der georgischen Hauptstadt verändert hat, erzählt sie in diesem Interview.

By Nino Lejava, Jelena Nikolic

LGBT Rights in the South Caucasus

Wars, state failure, social and economic problems – for more than one decade after the fall of the Soviet Union, the three states of the South Caucasus, Armenia, Georgia and Azerbaijan were faced with existential challenges. With the consolidation of state structures, the at least transitional freezing of territorial conflicts, and the strengthening of ties with Western Europe, attention to the rights of sexual minorities also increased.

By Silvia Stöber

Between Appearance and Reality in Baku: LGBT Rights in Azerbaijan

Azerbaijan’s capital Baku was ready when the Eurovision Song Contest took place there at the end of May 2012. All guests were welcome. “Baku was very open and liberal,” Stern.de journalist Jens Maier describes the atmosphere. “A gay club was opened. I do not know of any cases in which problems arose or people felt threatened.” Two openly gay activists, Elham Bagirov and Kamran Rzayev, also remember the excitement of this occasion.

By Silvia Stöber

Armenia: A Closed Society

In Armenia, everyone is proud of Sergei Parajanov. He is characterized among the most original film directors of the 20th century and has as a result been recognized by colleagues in the same league as French director Jean-Luc Godard. The fact that Parajanov, who died in 1990, spent five years in prison during the Soviet era because he supposedly propagated homosexuality is mostly kept quiet, however. When people refer to this, it is immediately assumed that they do so in order to denigrate Parajanov.

By Silvia Stöber

Freedom and Fear

The public discussion held at the Heinrich Boell Foundation on 16 May was dedicated to the International Day of Fighting against Homophobia and Transphobia, which is denoted on 17 May.

Free Women’s Rights!

The South Caucasus Regional Office of the Heinrich Boell Foundation hosted a round table entitled “LBT Rights are Women’s Rights” on 12 March 2012. The round table was a part of the Week of 8th March Campaign organized by “Women’s Initiatives Supporting Group”. The photo exhibition “A Room of One’s Own” was also part of the event, where participants could view professional and amateur photographers’ works.